Universal Education

EDUCATION FOR ALL

A country is not about its land or resources; it is about the people who live in it. Indeed if the human resource is top class the country would be one of the best in the world. Now the big question is what makes people strong and what must be done to make them strong. Two things come to mind, first is their health and second of course is education.

Indian School Children

Literacy rate of India is 77.7%

A well informed, articulate and intelligent citizen is the best asset a country can have. The education makes what we are; it gives perspective in life, it gives us analytical mind that can reason what is good for us and our society. The pre-requisite of a great nation is universal education. Each and every citizen should be educated and should have opportunities to explore the options that make his life worth living.

We must thank the makers of our constitution that gives so much emphasis on education. Our constitution says that it shall be the duty of the state to provide education to each and every child in the country.

Providing free and compulsory education to all children is a goal that is enshrined in the Indian Constitution as a Fundamental Right. This, indeed, is also the focus of the World Declaration on ‘Education for All’, adopted nearly 25 years ago.

Following this commitment, India prepared a National Plan of Education (2002) delineating various programs and strategies for achieving various Education for All (EFA) Goals. Subsequently, the mid- term assessment of progress of EFA goals, undertaken in 2005, underscored the concern for equity and inclusion and highlighted the need for accelerating the efforts for achieving EFA goals.

India, undoubtedly, has made substantial progress towards achieving universal education during the last two decades. Adoption of Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act (RTE), 2009 has given further impetus to the national efforts for ensuring quality education for all in a time- bound manner.

As per The United Nations Development Program (UNDP), India has made significant progress in universalizing primary education. India is on track to achieve this goal. Enrolment and completion rates of girls in primary school are improving and catching up with those of boys. However, the road to RTE is not a smooth one and there are several challenges on the way. Some are as follows:

Lack of quality in government schools
High disparity in quality of private schools
Teacher absenteeism
Lack of teacher training
Lack of vocation-focused curriculum development
Over emphasis on rote-learning (remnants of the British era and industrial revolution)
Corruption, nepotism, and lack of transparency
These challenges have manifested themselves in the learning outcomes for children. The enforcement of free and compulsory education is still an issue. Challenges range from lack of political will to poor resource allocation. For example, India allocates 3.5% of its GDP towards education. The government’s major scheme for universal education is the Sarva Shikhsha Abhiyan. Lack of co-ordination between central and state government leads to lapses during execution.

An UN survey numerated he following pitfalls in Indian Education system

Lakhs of jobs for teachers are lying vacant
A large percentage of teachers are not trained at all
1 in every 3 primary schools do not follow the prescribed student-teacher ratio of 30:1 as per RTE act
In spite of the challenges, RTE has made meaningful progress in a short span of time. Indicators related to enrolment, inclusiveness, quality, and infrastructure have shown significant improvements.

Many of the states have been successful in ensuring that the schools meet the requirements as prescribed in the act. After initial hiccups, most states have shown a marked improvement in filling up seats under RTE quota.

While the progress has been inconsistent RTE has definitely brought education into the limelight. India has moved a step closer to achieving universal education with RTE. As per UNESCO, India will meet universal education goals by 2050 for primary level and 2060 for lower secondary level.

When you hire a lawyer you are hiring someone to represent you. But many times you may not need to go to court and your problem can be easily solved without even going to court – counseling, mediation, and conflict resolution outside the courts is a very viable option. But in case you need to go to court for sure You can seek legal advice on various legal categories like accident law, bankruptcy law, business law, child custody, child support, criminal law, divorce, drunk driving, employment labor law, estate planning, family law, immigration law, injury law, landlord-tenant, real estate law, social security law, traffic law. Criminal law basics include arrests and searches, drug charges, drunk driving, marijuana driving, juvenile laws, etc. Dr. Kislay Panday and his team provide the consultancy free of cost and it can even be sought on phone or online.

A person can ask his legal question & start chatting with the lawyers. The answer will notify to your given email id/Phone. When you call 9899999999 you’ll be connected with an attorney from Dr. Kislay Panday’s law firm and will listen to your concerns, and who can explain the options available to you moving forward.

If you so desire you can go plead your case by yourself. Section 32 of the Advocate’s Act clearly mentions, the court may allow any person to appear before it even if he is not an advocate. Therefore, one gets the statutory right to defend one’s own case through Advocate Act in India.

A well informed, articulate and intelligent citizen is the best asset a country can have. The education makes what we are; it gives perspective in life, it gives us analytical mind that can reason what is good for us and our society. The pre-requisite of a great nation is universal education. Each and every citizen should be educated and should have opportunities to explore the options that make his life worth living.

We must thank the makers of our constitution that gives so much emphasis on education. Our constitution says that it shall be the duty of the state to provide education to each and every child in the country.

Providing free and compulsory education to all children is a goal that is enshrined in the Indian Constitution as a Fundamental Right. This, indeed, is also the focus of the World Declaration on ‘Education for All’, adopted nearly 25 years ago.

Following this commitment, India prepared a National Plan of Education (2002) delineating various programs and strategies for achieving various Education for All (EFA) Goals. Subsequently, the mid- term assessment of progress of EFA goals, undertaken in 2005, underscored the concern for equity and inclusion and highlighted the need for accelerating the efforts for achieving EFA goals.

India, undoubtedly, has made substantial progress towards achieving universal education during the last two decades. Adoption of Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act (RTE), 2009 has given further impetus to the national efforts for ensuring quality education for all in a time- bound manner.

As per The United Nations Development Program (UNDP), India has made significant progress in universalizing primary education. India is on track to achieve this goal. Enrolment and completion rates of girls in primary school are improving and catching up with those of boys. However, the road to RTE is not a smooth one and there are several challenges on the way. Some are as follows:

Lack of quality in government schools
High disparity in quality of private schools
Teacher absenteeism
Lack of teacher training
Lack of vocation-focused curriculum development
Over emphasis on rote-learning (remnants of the British era and industrial revolution)
Corruption, nepotism, and lack of transparency
These challenges have manifested themselves in the learning outcomes for children. The enforcement of free and compulsory education is still an issue. Challenges range from lack of political will to poor resource allocation. For example, India allocates 3.5% of its GDP towards education. The government’s major scheme for universal education is the Sarva Shikhsha Abhiyan. Lack of co-ordination between central and state government leads to lapses during execution.

An UN survey numerated he following pitfalls in Indian Education system

Lakhs of jobs for teachers are lying vacant
A large percentage of teachers are not trained at all
1 in every 3 primary schools do not follow the prescribed student-teacher ratio of 30:1 as per RTE act
In spite of the challenges, RTE has made meaningful progress in a short span of time. Indicators related to enrolment, inclusiveness, quality, and infrastructure have shown significant improvements.

Many of the states have been successful in ensuring that the schools meet the requirements as prescribed in the act. After initial hiccups, most states have shown a marked improvement in filling up seats under RTE quota.

While the progress has been inconsistent RTE has definitely brought education into the limelight. India has moved a step closer to achieving universal education with RTE. As per UNESCO, India will meet universal education goals by 2050 for primary level and 2060 for lower secondary level.

When you hire a lawyer you are hiring someone to represent you. But many times you may not need to go to court and your problem can be easily solved without even going to court – counseling, mediation, and conflict resolution outside the courts is a very viable option. But in case you need to go to court for sure You can seek legal advice on various legal categories like accident law, bankruptcy law, business law, child custody, child support, criminal law, divorce, drunk driving, employment labor law, estate planning, family law, immigration law, injury law, landlord-tenant, real estate law, social security law, traffic law. Criminal law basics include arrests and searches, drug charges, drunk driving, marijuana driving, juvenile laws, etc. Dr. Kislay Panday and his team provide the consultancy free of cost and it can even be sought on phone or online.

A person can ask his legal question & start chatting with the lawyers. The answer will notify to your given email id/Phone. When you call 9899999999 you’ll be connected with an attorney from Dr. Kislay Panday’s law firm and will listen to your concerns, and who can explain the options available to you moving forward.

If you so desire you can go plead your case by yourself. Section 32 of the Advocate’s Act clearly mentions, the court may allow any person to appear before it even if he is not an advocate. Therefore, one gets the statutory right to defend one’s own case through Advocate Act in India.

My Goals

What I want to Achieve

I want a world, where no child would suffer. Charitable instincts would prevail. There would be global acceptance of all different types of people. Man will co-exist with nature and freedom, equality, justice, liberty and fraternity will prevail.

Stay in Touch with Us

Contact Information

FOLLOW ME ON

Stay Updated

visit us

Our Location

Infova, 2nd floor, Milap Bhawan, Bahadurshah Zafar Marg. New Delhi. INDIA. 110002

mail us

Send A Message